Do You Make These Mistakes When Writing?

 

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So, you’ve just wrote that killer post and it’s close to be posted. Just one more step. Time to proof read.

I don’t know one person who finds the job of proof reading fun. In fact, I know a few people who just don’t bother with this vital task.

No matter how well you proof read there will always be some grammar errors in your writing – whether it be in a blog post or a novel chapter. Don’t you worry, I’m here to save you! (I also promise to make this as painful painless as possible by using as much humour as I can muster.)

Loose vs Lose

This is a common mistake and one that annoys many grammar freaks (such as myself).
Loose: the opposite of tight.
Lose: the opposite of win or to be deprived of something.

This bracelet is very loose, I hope I don’t lose it.


Correct Grammar Can Save A Person’s Life

I’m hungry; let’s eat Dad!
I’m hungry; let’s eat, Dad!

Just in case you are wondering the importance of this post. 😉


i.e VS e.g

As similar as these two Latin abbreviations might seem they mean quite different things.

The Latin phrase id est is translated to ‘that is to say’ so i.e. is a way of saying ‘in other words’.
It’s best used when giving a definition or alternate that is more clear. It is most similar to the commonly used abbreviation a.k.a which means ‘also know as’

The Latin phrase exempli gratia is literally translated to ‘for the sake of example’ which, in other words, means ‘for example’, so e.g. is used before giving any examples to support your point or previous sentence.


A lot

Remember that ‘a lot’ has a space between a and lot. Alot is not a word – you don’t write alittle, apig, aclock so don’t write alot

How to remember this? There is a lot of space in outer space.


Full Stop. Inside or Outside of brackets?

A full stop appears inside the brackets when the bracket contains a complete sentence.

She took the heavy book. (Jim took the lighter one.)

The full stop appears outside of the brackets if there is not a complete sentence within the brackets.

She took the heavy book (because Jim took the lighter one).


Is there a grammar rule you need me to clarify? Would you like to let me know if this post was helpful to you and where you are going to share it? (Hint hint.) Maybe you’d like to correct the grammar in this post because I obviously haven’t checked it thoroughly enough? Whatever the reason, I’d love for you to drop me a comment.

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3 Comments

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  1. Really interesting and very useful, I have bookmarked this post for another day. I believe you got the majority of the most common mistakes in grammar right there! Good job.

    • Aww, I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Grammar is a common difficulty among many writers I know, including myself sometimes, and so I decided to solidate my learning of it at the same time as trying to help others.

  2. Lovely post. Helpful and full of humour – keep them coming!

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